Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately half of all adults in the United States suffer from gum disease. Without consistent care and attention, a person's gums will become swollen and infected. Swelling and infection will in turn lead to a buildup of plaque and bacteria, a condition known as gingivitis. Left untreated, gingivitis will cause the structures supporting the teeth to weaken, leading to the condition known as gum disease or periodontitis.

The effect of proper oral hygiene on our overall health is only now being fully understood. Numerous research efforts have shown that there is a clear statistical link between gum disease and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism underlying this connection is not fully understood.

Two basic mechanisms are currently being studied which scientists hypothesize are the basis for the connection between gum disease and cardiovascular disease.

  1. As mentioned above, gum disease is associated with inflammation and infection. Scientists believe that the bacteria associated with infection are able to enter the bloodstream via the diseased gums themselves. In other words, gum disease is both the cause of infection and the doorway which allows bacteria to enter the bloodstream.

Once in the bloodstream, bacteria can reach multiple destinations, where it will cause inflammation, infection and destruction in susceptible areas. The heart, in particular, and the cardiovascular system, in general, are highly susceptible to damage caused by infection.

Included in the evidence for this hypothesis is the fact that researchers have shown that the most common bacteria found in the coronary arteries is P. gingivalis. Combined with the fact that more than half of all adults in the United States suffer from some form of gum disease, it is not surprising that this particular bacteria is the type most commonly found in the coronary arteries.

  1. Generally speaking, inflammation is a protective mechanism which occurs as a response to pathogens. However, chronic inflammation often leads to illness or disease. In the case of gum disease, it is hypothesized that chronic inflammation and infection lead to inflammation of the cardiovascular system. Eventually this cardiovascular inflammation will itself becomes chronic, causing cardiovascular disease.

As mentioned above, researchers have shown that the most common bacteria found in the coronary arteries is P. gingivalis. This bacteria is a known cause of inflammation.              

So, in other worlds, don’t be surprised if your cardiologist reminds you to be consistent and careful about taking care of our teeth and gums. Proper oral hygiene may allow us to prevent or slow the devastating effects of the nation's number one killer, heart disease.

Regency Jewish Heritage has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to form The NJ Heart and Lung Center™

Our program:

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include:

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

We offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to contact us.

The humble fruit fly, drosophila melanogaster, is not merely a kitchen pest. Its short lifecycle and large number of offspring have made it a favorite for genetic research, including the massive Human Genome Project (HGP).

The fly’s genes were studied and mapped in the early 1900s, but it was not until the 1990s that international collaboration allowed the mapping all human genes, collectively known as the human “genome.” The project was completed in 2003, with over 20,000 human genes identified.

Since 2003, this new data has allowed the blossoming of genetic research and genetic counseling. It has also produced a new industry: “over-the-counter” genetic testing. With just a small sample of genetic material, usually obtained through a swab of saliva, a variety of companies are ready to sell you a “genetically-based prediction” of your response to a variety of medications. There’s just one problem: the tests are not necessarily accurate.

While genetically tailor-made treatments for various conditions are currently in the research phase, and perhaps one day we truly will be able to find out useful information about our health at low cost, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns that today is not that day.

The FDA published an alert to consumers and clinicians that the agency has not reviewed many of the claims made by genetic laboratories, and that those claims may not be backed by scientific evidence. The FDA warns of the “inappropriate treatment decisions and potentially serious health consequences” for people who rely on these tests, and recommends that no one change their medication based on an over-the-counter genetic test.

The FDA also announced that they are investigating developers who use misleading advertising to sell genetic tests. The agency requests that anyone who has a problem with any laboratory test files a report via Medwatch, the FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we embrace innovation, but do not fall prey to trendy promises. We care for our residents with clinically-proven programming, nutritious and delicious meals, and, of course, compassionate care from specially trained caregivers and therapists.

We pride ourselves on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

The humble fruit fly, drosophila melanogaster, is not merely a kitchen pest. Its short lifecycle and large number of offspring have made it a favorite for genetic research, including the massive Human Genome Project (HGP).

The fly’s genes were studied and mapped in the early 1900s, but it was not until the 1990s that international collaboration allowed the mapping all human genes, collectively known as the human “genome.” The project was completed in 2003, with over 20,000 human genes identified.

Since 2003, this new data has allowed the blossoming of genetic research and genetic counseling. It has also produced a new industry: “over-the-counter” genetic testing. With just a small sample of genetic material, usually obtained through a swab of saliva, a variety of companies are ready to sell you a “genetically-based prediction” of your response to a variety of medications. There’s just one problem: the tests are not necessarily accurate.

While genetically tailor-made treatments for various conditions are currently in the research phase, and perhaps one day we truly will be able to find out useful information about our health at low cost, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns that today is not that day.

The FDA published an alert to consumers and clinicians that the agency has not reviewed many of the claims made by genetic laboratories, and that those claims may not be backed by scientific evidence. The FDA warns of the “inappropriate treatment decisions and potentially serious health consequences” for people who rely on these tests, and recommends that no one change their medication based on an over-the-counter genetic test.

The FDA also announced that they are investigating developers who use misleading advertising to sell genetic tests. The agency requests that anyone who has a problem with any laboratory test files a report via Medwatch, the FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we embrace innovation, but do not fall prey to trendy promises. We care for our residents with clinically-proven programming, nutritious and delicious meals, and, of course, compassionate care from specially trained caregivers and therapists.

We pride ourselves on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

In a healthy adult, at rest, the heart beats between 60 and 100 times a minute. Cells in the upper right chamber of the heart generate an electrical signal that travels through the heart, and makes it beat, a sort of cardiac “spark plug,” if you will.

However, if for some reason the heart’s “sparkplug” is not working properly, the heart will not beat regularly, a condition known as arrhythmia. In some cases, arrhythmia needs to be addressed by inserting an artificial spark plug, known as a pacemaker.

 

Who Might Need a Pacemaker?

Pacemakers are most commonly used to treat bradycardia, an abnormally slow heartbeat. Other disorders, such as heart block, heart failure, and Long QT Syndrome, may also need to be brought under control with a pacemaker.

Does a Pacemaker Require Open-Heart Surgery?

No. Pacemakers are inserted through a small incision, usually under local anesthesia. In most cases, insertion takes approximately two hours. Patients are generally able to leave the hospital within a couple of days.

How Long Does Recovery Take?

Recovery can take anywhere from a few days to a few months. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) recommends enrollment in a cardiac rehabilitation program following pacemaker surgery. Cardiac rehab provides coordinated care, and is the safest way for a pacemaker patient to ease themselves back into their normal life. Medicare and most insurance plans cover cardiac rehab for pacemaker insertions.

Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers’ cardiac care provides rehabilitation at the highest level recommended by the ACC. Contact Regency by clicking here.

Do I Have to Limit My Activities If I Have a Pacemaker?

Once you have been cleared by your doctor, you do not need to limit your activities after pacemaker insertion.

However strong electromagnetic fields may interfere with the functioning of your pacemaker. For this reason, people with pacemakers should not have MRIs.

Your doctor will give you a pacemaker ID card, which you should carry with you at all times. You should also consider wearing a MedicAlert bracelet that states that you have a pacemaker.

Cell phones are safe, but should be kept at least6 to 12 inches away from the pacemaker.

Metal detectors, such as those found at airports and some stores, are generally safe. You will want to minimize your exposure by walking through them quickly and by not standing near them.

Hand-held metal detectors, however, do pose some risk. If you are selected for special screening with a hand-held device at the airport, it is important to show your pacemaker ID card. The staff will then check you in a different way.

Some medical devices may also interfere with pacemakers. Always inform your doctor that you have a pacemaker before undergoing any procedure.

How Long Will My Pacemaker Last?

Typically, the part of the pacemaker that wears out is the battery. Most pacemaker batteries last between 5 and 15 years. The procedure to replace the battery is quick, and does not require much recovery time.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in the most appropriate and patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death both in the United States, and globally. For men in particular, half of all death are caused by heart disease.
Over the last few decades, many powerful new drugs have been invented to stave off or lower the risk of cardiovascular disease: statins to control cholesterol and triglycerides, new blood thinners and blood pressure medications to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes, beta blockers, and many more. Although many of these medications have been proven to lower an individual's risk of a cardiovascular event, the overall risk for such events still remains high.
Recently, a large study, published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, revealed that a new drug may prove to be an important step forward in the search for drugs to control and prevent heart disease. The new drug, Vascepa, is derived from fish oil. Since fish oil, and omega-3 fatty acids in general, were already known to be good for the heart, it is not surprising that this highly purified and concentrated omega-3 fatty acid has been shown to be beneficial for the heart. What was surprising, however, was the extent of benefit provided; it surpassed all expectations.
An initial study of Vascepa's effectiveness was conducted with approximately 10,000 high-risk patients already taking heart medications. The results of the study showed that this drug reduced the occurrence of first, second, and subsequent heart attacks, as well as strokes and other cardiovascular problems, by nearly one third.
The study's lead investigator, Dr. Deepak Bhatt, stated, "With this drug, we are not only preventing that first heart attack, but potentially the second stroke and maybe that third fatal event. [...] Prevention of such subsequent cardiovascular events could improve patient outcomes and quality of life and may lower the total cost burden of medical care."
Results of this study were presented at the American College of Cardiology scientific meeting in New Orleans. A detailed breakdown of the data presented showed that Vascepa cut the rate of a first cardiovascular event by 25%, a second cardiovascular event by 32%, and further cardiovascular events by 48%, in comparison to the control group.
It is important to remember, that besides the cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that almost all of the participants in this study were taking, most participants were also taking other heart medications to control their blood pressure or to prevent blood clots. The implications of this are that Vascepa provides a important new addition to the arsenal of weapons that can be used to fight heart disease.
The pace of medical innovation today is astounding. It is not unreasonable to expect that this pace will only continue to accelerate, and that fundamental breakthroughs will be made to fight cardiovascular disease.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in the most appropriate and patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.
Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death both in the United States, and globally. For men in particular, half of all death are caused by heart disease.
Over the last few decades, many powerful new drugs have been invented to stave off or lower the risk of cardiovascular disease: statins to control cholesterol and triglycerides, new blood thinners and blood pressure medications to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes, beta blockers, and many more. Although many of these medications have been proven to lower an individual's risk of a cardiovascular event, the overall risk for such events still remains high.
Recently, a large study, published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, revealed that a new drug may prove to be an important step forward in the search for drugs to control and prevent heart disease. The new drug, Vascepa, is derived from fish oil. Since fish oil, and omega-3 fatty acids in general, were already known to be good for the heart, it is not surprising that this highly purified and concentrated omega-3 fatty acid has been shown to be beneficial for the heart. What was surprising, however, was the extent of benefit provided; it surpassed all expectations.
An initial study of Vascepa's effectiveness was conducted with approximately 10,000 high-risk patients already taking heart medications. The results of the study showed that this drug reduced the occurrence of first, second, and subsequent heart attacks, as well as strokes and other cardiovascular problems, by nearly one third.
The study's lead investigator, Dr. Deepak Bhatt, stated, "With this drug, we are not only preventing that first heart attack, but potentially the second stroke and maybe that third fatal event. [...] Prevention of such subsequent cardiovascular events could improve patient outcomes and quality of life and may lower the total cost burden of medical care."
Results of this study were presented at the American College of Cardiology scientific meeting in New Orleans. A detailed breakdown of the data presented showed that Vascepa cut the rate of a first cardiovascular event by 25%, a second cardiovascular event by 32%, and further cardiovascular events by 48%, in comparison to the control group.
It is important to remember, that besides the cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that almost all of the participants in this study were taking, most participants were also taking other heart medications to control their blood pressure or to prevent blood clots. The implications of this are that Vascepa provides a important new addition to the arsenal of weapons that can be used to fight heart disease.
The pace of medical innovation today is astounding. It is not unreasonable to expect that this pace will only continue to accelerate, and that fundamental breakthroughs will be made to fight cardiovascular disease.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in the most appropriate and patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.
Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

The anterior olfactory nucleus, a region in the forebrain that registers odor, has recently been implicated in areas that range far beyond — but is still linked with — the sense of smell.

Recently, a team of Swedish investigators published a study in the Journal of Neuroscience, reporting that breathing through the nose is more helpful for the storage and consolidation of memories than breathing through the mouth.

There are two important aspects of the study’s findings. The first is that memory is better stored and consolidated while breathing through the nose. The second concerns the process that mediates between breathing, learning, and memory retrieval.

The team pointed out that although their scientific investigation of the relationship between breathing and memory, as well as the technology they are using for their investigations, is new, the concept of breathing affecting our behavior and our memory is actually very old.

In the words of lead author Dr. Artin Arshamian,"This knowledge has been around for thousands of years, in such areas as meditation. But no one has managed to prove scientifically what actually goes on the brain. We now have tools that can reveal new clinical knowledge."

The anterior olfactory nucleus also plays a lead role in another study, published in Nature Communications, which shows that people with good spatial memory are better at identifying smells than people with poor spatial memory.

The sense of smell even seems to hold a key to dementia risk. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found a strong connection between a person’s ability to identify smells and their risk of developing dementia.

Losing one’s sense of smell may prove to be an strong indicator of dementia risk, and the study’s researchers posit that risk of dementia may be one day be able to be assessed through a simple, inexpensive smell test.

A hospital stay is difficult, especially for an older person. Going home? Not necessarily much easier.

Getting to the “new normal” may involve postsurgical wound care, a new diet, new medications, and a flurry of follow-up appointments. The home may even need to be retrofitted with grab bars and ramps, even for a short-term recovery.

Transitioning to home from the hospital is so difficult, in fact, that 20% of Medicare patients discharged from a hospital must be readmitted within the month.

This transition can be made easier — and safer — by including a stay in a short-term rehabilitation program. A short-term rehab program, like that at the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, can last anywhere from a few days to several weeks, depending on the patient’s condition, and can make all the difference in the patient’s recovery.

Healthcare professionals and families throughout New Jersey have come to rely on Regency Rehab to fill this crucial transitional role between the hospital and home.

Regency Rehab’s approach to rehabilitation is informed and driven by the same unique experience and philosophy that guides our long-term care mission. We think of each individual in our care as a “total patient” while focusing on specific rehabilitation needs. This approach also means that we recognize that some of our patients will not benefit from aggressive therapy and that for others, returning home to independent living may not be a realistic goal. In these cases, our programs are designed to ensure high levels of comfort and stability, while helping to achieve maximum independence and quality of life.

At Regency, we maintain the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

 

 

Special thanks to our Guest Writer, Hazel Bridges of Aging Wellness, for contributing this exclusive article for our Regency readers

As a society, we’re living longer, healthier lives than ever before. There are many ways we can maximize our potential to stay well and improve how we feel. Thankfully, with the aid of technology, things that used to be timely and difficult are now more accessible.

Make Exercise Fun and Safe

The best way to stick to an exercise regimen is to enjoy it. However, we want to be sure that the workout we choose is safe for us. One way to avoid injury is to make sure your activities are low-impact. Some areas you may want to focus on are strength, flexibility and balance. If you need to protect your joints, as many of us do, consider yoga or swimming. Both use just about every muscle in the body and swimming can strengthen the heart. If you’re looking for something a bit more active, you could take dancing lessons designed specifically for seniors. You could engage in golf, one of the country’s more popular pastimes. Or you can simply go for walks in the park, an indoor mall or around the neighborhood. Walking is good exercise for the muscles and the heart and less impacting than jogging.

Keep Sharp

While one of the best ways to keep our brains healthy is to keep up with exercise, there are plenty of entertaining methods to add to it. Hobbies and games are a fun way to pass time and keep your mind sharp. You could try classic card or board games, but don’t overlook the games available on your smartphone or tablet. Reading regularly can reduce your chance of dementia by up to fifty percent. Just 30 minutes of relaxing reading daily can lead to great improvement in cognitive function, but you can also try taking adult education classes to keep your mind fresh. You may even be able to get reduced tuition thanks to scholarships specifically created for seniors. You might be surprised to see how many other retirees are at your local university. Writing is another fun hobby you can pick up to keep your brain healthy, but not just any writing. Try handwriting in a journal or notebook for maximum benefit.

Eat for Health

Nutrition plays an important role in health throughout our lives, but is especially important as we age. If you struggle to eat a balanced diet, never fear. There are plenty of ways to improve your dietary habits. Cooking from home is a good way to ensure you know exactly what you eat, and being adventurous can also be advantageous. Branch out and try new fruits and vegetables, or even cook ones you may not be thrilled with in new ways. This can be a fun way to broaden your diet and improve health. If you don’t like cooking, have difficulty leaving the home, or find yourself with too little time on your hands, you may want to look at meal delivery services. They can help you to have nutritious meals with no effort on your part and technology makes it easier. Smartphone apps can help you create healthy shopping lists, or have groceries and meals delivered right to your front door.

Stay Connected

It may be surprising, but our emotional connections play a large role not only in quality of life, but also in our health. If you lead a busy life, finding time for such things can seem difficult, but it doesn’t take much. You can plan your shopping trips with a friend and catch up together as you browse. It could be taking a class at a community center, or grabbing a cup of tea every other week with a loved one. These small actions add up and greatly improve how we feel -- and may even affect how long we live.

Staying well may seem daunting, but it can be fun. Find things you enjoy doing, bring a friend, and invest in eating nutritious foods. You might be surprised how much better you feel each and every day following a healthy routine.

We are thrilled to have received a fantastic new review last night, April 11, 2018, for Regency Jewish Heritage in Somerset, NJ, posted on Caring.com!

Take a look:

 

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