Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

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Judah

The Regency organization has become synonymous with the best in senior healthcare and has garnered a well deserved reputation for its unsurpassed commitment to its patients and residents.

The Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers and Facilities throughout New Jersey have achieved numerous industry ‘gold standard’ benchmarks and have received accolades from all corners of the HealthCare community.

Welcome to our website at www.RegencyNursing.com!

Warm Regards,

Judah

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Regency Nursing Centers Founder and President, David Gross, has long spearheaded and championed many charitable initiatives for Jewish causes. This has always been a source of tremendous pride for us at Regency Jewish Heritage!

His latest successful initiative with the venerable Jewish institution, Agudath Israel of America, is no exception.

This article was recently published by Harry Glazer writing for the Jewish Voice.

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Dogged determination has led to the recent success of the New Jersey office of Agudath Israel of America’s efforts—tracking a growing need, mobilizing yeshiva parents, working with a principled and persuasive leader in the New Jersey state legislature—in getting a notable increase in state funding enacted in the New Jersey state budget.

In 1977 the New Jersey State Legislature established a category of allocations to nonpublic schools termed “192 Auxiliary Services,” which would fund remedial instruction in English, language arts and math. Over the decades that followed, 192 Auxiliary Services received limited New Jersey state funding, until the legislature took action in 2010—at the behest of groups like Agudath Israel—to more fully fund this need. That year, based on the assessed number of students needing services in nonpublic schools, the state allocated $31,650,000 or $995 per student, per year.

At the time, this allocation was a great victory and made a major difference in the lives of yeshiva families whose children struggled with learning difficulties. While the allocation per child did not cover all the expenses, it went a long way.

As the years went on, though, the allocation stayed at that fixed rate while the conditions in yeshivot changed. As Rabbi Avi Schnall, director of the Agudath Israel of America’s New Jersey office, noted: “The allocation had to be adjusted, to meet the growing need and to reflect current costs of those services.” Rabbi Schnall reports that some yeshivas were considering cutting some of their remedial services just to be able to afford the others. He also pointed out that 192 Auxiliary Services funds support services for children who are being mainstreamed; “they just need a boost” to make it in their schools.

In the 2020-2021 school year, the Agudath Israel of America’s New Jersey office undertook a concerted campaign to advocate for an increase in the New Jersey state allocation for 192 Auxiliary Services. They mobilized hundreds of affected yeshiva parents, who were becoming increasingly hard pressed to pay for these services, to send priority letters to members of the New Jersey legislature. Rabbi Schnall testified before the New Jersey Senate Budget Committee in early spring (before pandemic precautions were put in place). And Agudath Israel redoubled its efforts to work with a key ally, Deputy New Jersey State Assembly Speaker Gary Schaer.

Unexpectedly, the pandemic that broke out and upended many of the ways we conduct our lives also had the effect of highlighting to New Jersey legislators the critical importance of support services in K-12 schools. With schools relying on remote instruction, the plight of students who struggled to “keep up” became more pronounced and more prominent.

When all these factors came together, the net result was remarkable. In the New Jersey state budget signed into law shortly before Sukkot, the legislators included a $2 million increase in funding for 192 Auxiliary Services—bringing the total allocation to $33,650,00. This increase effectively added $50 per child, per year, to children now receiving remedial services.

Rabbi Schnall stated: “In a year where the state grappled with a $6 billion deficit, the fact that we got an increase in 192 Auxiliary Services funding, it’s amazing. This new allocation also showed the members of the legislature that the existing allocation needed to be adjusted, which positions us well for discussions on next year’s state budget.”

Rabbi Schnall expressed thanks to Assemblyman Schaer for his work to make this increase happen and also to Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin, Senate President Stephen Sweeney and New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, who all strongly supported this increase.

David Gross of Clifton, chairman of the Agudath Israel of America’s New Jersey office, stated: “I’ve been working with Rabbi Heshy Hirth of Passaic and Ralph Zucker of Lakewood, who founded and funded the Agudath Israel of America’s New Jersey office with me, decades ago. I’ve learned that the road to accomplishing what you seek in politics can take decades. But if you persevere, effectively establish the justice of your claim and that you represent law-abiding good citizens, and build important relationships, you can eventually see success. We are so pleased to have a champion like Assemblyman Gary Schaer, who has the unique talent of mobilizing his colleagues to support important communal needs like this one.”

“This crisis has reminded us how interconnected our communities are, and how the struggles of one affect us all,” said Assemblyman Schaer. “Rabbi Schnall and Agudath Israel have been an inspiration to me as we have fought to increase the funding for these essential programs. We have ensured that every student is given the resources they need to succeed, regardless of what school they attend.”

 

 

They say "A picture is worth a thousand words."

 

Look what we just received in the mail at Regency Jewish Heritage in Somerset, NJ from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid!

Are we proud of this accomplishment?

You bet!

ABOUT REGENCY

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

According to the most recent figures, the three countries with the highest life expectancy are Japan, Singapore, and Monaco. Most experts agree that a major contributor to the high life expectancy in these countries is their diet.

It has become fashionable in recent times to declare some foods are “superfoods.” Most experts reject this term, though, since it suggests that eating one particular food can lead to good health and a longer life expectancy.

This “quick fix” mentality is dangerous to our physical and our mental health. Eating a bowl of ice cream topped with acai berries is not only naïve, it is an ineffective and dangerous method of ensuring good health. Relying on “superfoods” to upgrade an otherwise healthy diet cannot have a positive effect on one’s health. We need to eat conscientiously on a daily basis.

That said, it is a fact that some foods are more nutritious than others, and we should certainly include these foods in our diet. The consensus is that the following foods that are highest in nutritional value:

  • Vegetables, especially leafy green vegetables and cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage)
  • Salmon and other fatty fish
  • Beans, particularly soybeans and soybean-derived products like tofu
  • Citrus fruits
  • Berries
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Healthy oils, such as olive oil
  • Seaweed products such as nori

Many of these products contain an abundance of antioxidants and flavonoids, which are known to help the body regulate its inflammatory response, slow down cellular aging, help protect the body against illness and disease, and reduce the risk of cancer.

Besides scientific evidence showing the positive health effects of these, they are consumed in higher proportions in those countries with the highest life expectancy.

In addition to introducing more nutrient-rich foods into our diets, it is important to avoid foods that are known to have destructive effects on our health. The most important rule is to avoid simple carbohydrates as much as possible. Simple carbohydrates are implicated in many chronic health conditions, including diabetes and heart disease. Simple carbohydrates include bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, and of course sugar and high fructose corn syrup.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. And that includes varied, well-balanced meals that support our residents’ physical and mental health.

Our Food Service Director, Dietician and dietary staff tailor gourmet meals to the clinical needs and personal preferences of each resident. Residents may participate in our menu planning by meeting with the Food Service Director to plan their own “Resident Choice” menus.

Family and friends play an important role in mental health, and we encourage this healthy socialization by allowing our residents’ visitors to always join us free of charge. Is there a birthday or other event? Our kitchen staff is happy to cater free birthday parties, barbeques and other special events.

We are proud that our award-winning, state-of-the-art kitchen and elegantly decorated dining rooms exceed the latest Department of Health and Advisory Standards for food quality, preparation, variety and, of course, taste.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

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