Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

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They say "A picture is worth a thousand words."

 

Look what we just received in the mail at Regency Jewish Heritage in Somerset, NJ from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid!

Are we proud of this accomplishment?

You bet!

ABOUT REGENCY

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

Friday, 20 March 2020 19:28

Want to Live Longer? Watch Your Diet!

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According to the most recent figures, the three countries with the highest life expectancy are Japan, Singapore, and Monaco. Most experts agree that a major contributor to the high life expectancy in these countries is their diet.

It has become fashionable in recent times to declare some foods are “superfoods.” Most experts reject this term, though, since it suggests that eating one particular food can lead to good health and a longer life expectancy.

This “quick fix” mentality is dangerous to our physical and our mental health. Eating a bowl of ice cream topped with acai berries is not only naïve, it is an ineffective and dangerous method of ensuring good health. Relying on “superfoods” to upgrade an otherwise healthy diet cannot have a positive effect on one’s health. We need to eat conscientiously on a daily basis.

That said, it is a fact that some foods are more nutritious than others, and we should certainly include these foods in our diet. The consensus is that the following foods that are highest in nutritional value:

  • Vegetables, especially leafy green vegetables and cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage)
  • Salmon and other fatty fish
  • Beans, particularly soybeans and soybean-derived products like tofu
  • Citrus fruits
  • Berries
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Healthy oils, such as olive oil
  • Seaweed products such as nori

Many of these products contain an abundance of antioxidants and flavonoids, which are known to help the body regulate its inflammatory response, slow down cellular aging, help protect the body against illness and disease, and reduce the risk of cancer.

Besides scientific evidence showing the positive health effects of these, they are consumed in higher proportions in those countries with the highest life expectancy.

In addition to introducing more nutrient-rich foods into our diets, it is important to avoid foods that are known to have destructive effects on our health. The most important rule is to avoid simple carbohydrates as much as possible. Simple carbohydrates are implicated in many chronic health conditions, including diabetes and heart disease. Simple carbohydrates include bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, and of course sugar and high fructose corn syrup.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. And that includes varied, well-balanced meals that support our residents’ physical and mental health.

Our Food Service Director, Dietician and dietary staff tailor gourmet meals to the clinical needs and personal preferences of each resident. Residents may participate in our menu planning by meeting with the Food Service Director to plan their own “Resident Choice” menus.

Family and friends play an important role in mental health, and we encourage this healthy socialization by allowing our residents’ visitors to always join us free of charge. Is there a birthday or other event? Our kitchen staff is happy to cater free birthday parties, barbeques and other special events.

We are proud that our award-winning, state-of-the-art kitchen and elegantly decorated dining rooms exceed the latest Department of Health and Advisory Standards for food quality, preparation, variety and, of course, taste.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

Friday, 06 March 2020 02:33

Chronic Venous Insufficiency: Just the Facts

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Aches and pains might seem like a normal part of growing older, but persistent pain is always a matter for concern, and needs to be addressed.

Leg pain, especially after prolonged periods of standing or sitting, may be a symptom of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The veins in your legs contain valves that prevent blood from flowing backwards, but in CVI, these valves don’t work properly. This adds pressure on the veins, and causes blood to pool in your legs.

Symptoms of CVI

  • Painful leg cramps
  • Itchiness
  • Varicose veins
  • Tough, leathery leg skin
  • Brownish skin, usually around the ankles
  • Leg ulcers

Causes of CVI

CVI is relatively common, affecting up to 40% of Americans. Women are more likely than men to suffer from CVI. It is most common in those with:

  • Family history of CVI
  • Age over 50
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • History of blood clots
  • History of multiple pregnancies

Diagnosing CVI

Even if you have the symptoms and risk factors for CVI, it is important to be diagnosed by a doctor. A reliable diagnosis includes testing, usually using a Duplex ultrasound to give an image of the structure of your veins and how blood moves through them. You may also have other tests to ensure that there are no other reasons for your pain or swelling.

Treatment for CVI

It is important to treat CVI. Untreated, it can cause the capillaries in your legs to burst, leading to swelling and ulcers which can become infected.

Treatment may include:

  • Both standing and sitting will impede the blood flow to your legs. Walking, on the other hand, improves blood flow.
  • Compression hose. These prevent blood from pooling in your legs. Compression hose comes in a variety of weights and styles. Your doctor will be able to tell you which type of hose would be most beneficial.
  • You may need medication to prevent blood clots, or antibiotics to treat leg ulcers.
  • Weight loss. If obesity is contributing to your CVI, losing weight will alleviate the problem.
  • Medical treatment. In severe cases of CVI, your doctor may suggest one of a variety of medical treatments. Some are minimally invasive; however, 10% of CVI cases are so severe that they require more extensive surgery.

CVI is not just a nuisance or inconvenience. It needs to be addressed before it causes serious problems.

The staff at the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, , knows just how to deal with venous problems — as well as any other issue that may affect a senior.

We offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means following our residents’ health carefully, listening to them, and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence — and always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

If leg pain is hampering your quality of life, contact us by clicking here and find out which of our three facilities will best meet your needs.

Monday, 10 February 2020 20:16

Bring This Up at Your Next Annual Exam

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Whether you’re 20 or 80, healthy or sick, you need to have this conversation at your next annual exam.

It’s not about your current health concerns, it’s about your future ones.

Advance Care Planning involves thinking about the types of medical decisions you will want made for you if you are in a situation where you cannot state them yourself.

Sound morbid? It doesn’t have to be. This is a time for you to think about and communicate your personal values and desires about end-of-life care.

If you are receiving Medicare benefits, Medicare will pay for Advance Care Planning at your Welcome to Medicare Exam — and again at each Annual Wellness Visit.

The Advance Directive

The specific decisions you make are written into a legal document called an advance directive.

An advance directive might include whether you want to be put on a ventilator if you cannot breathe on your own, and whether you want CPR if your heart stops.

It is important to remember that these decisions are not set in stone. You can change them at any time — and likely will — as your situation, your health, or your feelings change.

The Healthcare Proxy

If you are currently young and in good health, it may be difficult to imagine what you would want at some unknown future point. For these reasons, it is best to designate a healthcare proxy, someone you trust to make medical decisions for you.

Your healthcare proxy might be a relative, but it doesn’t have to be. You might feel that a close friend or a person in your spiritual community might have a better sense of your values — and a clearer head in a medical emergency.

Both the advance directive and healthcare proxy form are legal documents, and how they are witnessed varies from state to state. Sometimes they even need to be notarized.

If you have Medicare coverage, the best time to have these discussions with your doctor is at the Welcome to Medicare visit or at your Annual Wellness Visit, when Medicare will cover the entire cost. But if you have missed that opportunity this year, don’t let that stop you. These are important decisions! Medicare’s Plan B also covers Advance Care Planning.

Thursday, 06 February 2020 00:32

3 Ways to Ensure a Safe Transfer to a Nursing Home

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Who can guide you when you are admitting your loved one to a nursing home? Most people turn to their doctor. But a study published in The Journal of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine suggests that this trusted source may not have all the answers the family needs.

The study found that internal medicine residents scored below 50% on a test regarding nursing homes, better known today as skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). Even after training, they were still uncertain about exactly what a skilled nursing facility is, what services it provides, and how it is staffed.

The study concludes that, “efforts to improve this knowledge are needed to assure proper triage of patients and safe transitions to the SNF.”

As is always true when making important medical decisions, the family should be as involved as possible when admitting a family member to a skilled nursing facility; they should not leave all decision-making to medical personnel.

The American Medical Directors Association (AMDA) has issued guidelines to help families ensure safe transfers — and, consequently, successful outcomes — for their loved ones.

They recommend the following 3 steps be the basis for every transfer from a hospital to a skilled nursing facility:

1. The patient’s preferences

Too often, discussions regarding a patient exclude the person most affected by the decision: the patient themselves. Include your loved one in discussions regarding the continuation of their care. This also means discussing — and documenting —their preferences for care at end-of-life.

2. Educating the family                                                                                                                                        

Decisions must be made, and the family should be sure they understand the reasons for them. For example, why is a skilled nursing facility being suggested, rather than a rehab facility?

3. Prompt and thorough communication about medication

Whenever someone is being moved from one facility to another, there is a risk that important information, especially information about medications, is not communicated. This increases the likelihood of errors in patient care.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we pride ourselves on our ability to initiate and maintain communication with the patient’s doctors, their family, and of course the patient themselves. It’s just one of the reasons so many people trust us with the care of their loved ones.

We follow our residents’ health carefully, listening to them, and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence — and always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities.

Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

Friday, 24 January 2020 01:04

5 Warning Signs of Serious Issues in Seniors

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For those of us who love someone elderly, it is important to be aware of red flags that signal potentially serious health issues. These signs are especially important if we can only visit the people we care about infrequently. Although phone calls can provide some information, many elderly people are reluctant to share their health concerns — even with their own children. It is also common for them to be unaware of potentially serious issues that are affecting them.

Here are 5 signs to watch out for:

1. Unexplained weight loss or weight gain

Unexplained weight loss is often a red flag for a serious underlying illness, in particular cancer. Even when the weight loss is not caused by serious illness, it is often a sign of depression, or a reflection of the individual's growing inability to care for themselves.

Unexplained weight gain is also a red flag, commonly reflecting depression, and a lack of interest in taking care of oneself. Snack foods are easier to eat than cooking a proper meal. And when people become depressed, their concern for proper nutrition is often one of the first things to go.

2. An unkempt appearance

When visiting an elderly person, one of the first things we should be aware of is their appearance. Are they clean? Are their clothes clean? Is their hair properly combed? Do their nails need to be trimmed? If any of these sorts of questions are answered in the negative, it’s a red flag.

Individuals who were formerly well groomed but no longer are, may be suffering from depression or an early stage of dementia. Another possible explanation for these changes is that a physical ailment may make taking care of themselves painful and difficult.

As mentioned, many elderly people are reluctant to mention their various ailments, and consequently their loved ones may be unaware of the situation. It is important to remember, when questioning an older person, that we not injure their pride. Our questions, therefore, must be asked in a respectful and tactful manner. But they must be asked.

3. Memory Loss

A certain degree of memory loss is, unfortunately, a common part of the aging process. However, when people begin forgetting important pieces of information, or are unable to remember important events in their life, we should be aware of the possibility of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. As with most diseases, the earlier a proper diagnosis is confirmed, the better the prognosis.

All signs of memory loss, for example, getting lost in a familiar place or an inability to find the right words to express an idea, should raise a red flag. In some cases, it is best to note the behavior and keep a close watch on it, rather than immediately rushing to the doctor and thereby alarming the person you are trying to protect. However, when you see a clear or accelerated decline, the time for a doctor visit has arrived.

4. Social isolation

Elderly people, especially those who have lost their spouse, can become isolated from those around them. Their loneliness can be extremely painful, and social isolation can lead to depression.

People with dementia often fear social situations, since they may be put in positions where their inability to remember facts and events will be apparent to those around them. However, being involved with other people is fundamental to staying psychologically healthy. If we are aware that the social habits of the elderly person we care about have changed, we should find out the reason for this change. Continual answers such as, "I'm just not in the mood," raise a red flag.

5. Decreased mobility

Falling is the main way for an elderly person to lose their independence. It is important to note if the senior we care about is having more trouble moving around their home. Do they seem to lose their balance more frequently? Do they need to lean on tables or against the wall in order to provide support as they move from one place to another? If the answers to any of these questions is yes, then steps need to be taken to ensure their safety.

For those who are walking independently, it might be time for a cane. For those using a cane, it might be time for a walker. And for those using a walker, it might be time for a wheelchair. It is not uncommon to encounter resistance to such suggestions, but it is extremely important for an older person to do what they can to avoid falling.

One important way to facilitate safe mobility is to ensure that the environment they live in is suited to their current physical abilities. For example, steps may no longer be possible, or there might be too many objects in the environment to make it possible to walk without the risk of tripping over something.

Clearly, regular medical care is important for an older person. But our concern for our aging parent or relative, along with our knowledge of their usual behaviors and our attention to the details mentioned above, can be equally important. We will often notice something long before a doctor would have noticed it. In this way we can help our loved one enjoy a higher quality of life, over a longer period of time.

If enough red flags have been raised, your loved one may no longer be safe at home. If that becomes the case, it is crucial to find a place where they will thrive, while being well-cared for, such as one of the Regency care centers. At Regency, we offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities.

We offer a comprehensive and stimulating array of programs is designed to appeal to a variety of tastes, interests and levels of ability, seven days a week. With an emphasis on empowering the residents, our recreational programs encourage patients and residents to fulfill their potential and remain engaged and involved. Individually tailored activities and programs include live entertainment, lectures, trips and events that encourage socialization and participation.

Regency care centers also offer a full continuum of care, including exceptional short-term rehabilitation, sub-acute care, long-term nursing, a range of specialty programs and complex clinical services, hospice care and temporary respite care. Our compassionate, personalized approach has established our long-standing and unparalleled reputation for excellence.

Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all seniors receive the following four vaccines:

  1. The seasonal flu vaccine (all ages, every year)
  2. The pneumococcal vaccine (adults 65 and older, every year)
  3. The shingles vaccine (adults 60 and older, every five years)
  4. A Td booster shot (all ages, every ten years)

These vaccines are especially important for people who have a weakened immune system or any of the following conditions:

  1. Asthma
  2. Cardiovascular Disease
  3. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  4. Heart Disease
  5. Lung Disease

However, any senior with one of the following chronic health conditions may need other vaccines, as well.

Asplenia
Anyone without a spleen, or whose spleen function is impaired, may also need:

  1. The Hib vaccine, to protect againstHaemophilus influenzae (once)
  2. The Meningococcal vaccine, to protect against meningitis and other diseases of the brain and spinal cord membranes (once, with possible boosters)
  3. The MMR vaccine, to protect against measles, mumps and rubella (once, if you were born after 1956, have never received the vaccine, and are not already immune)

 

Diabetes

Diabetics are at higher risk of hepatitis B than nondiabetics. If they are under 60 years old, they should receive the Hep B vaccine (three doses).

However the effectiveness of this vaccine decreases in older patients, and diabetics over the age of 60 should discuss with their healthcare provider whether they should receive it.

Kidney Disease

Anyone with kidney disease or kidney failure is at greater risk of Hepatitis B, and may need a Hep B vaccine (three doses). Although hepatitis is most commonly associated with the liver, it also affects the kidneys.

Liver Disease

Someone with with liver disease should receive:

  1. The Hep A vaccine (two doses) and Hep B vaccine (three doses), because hepatitis affects the liver.
  2. The MMR vaccine, to protect against measles, mumps and rubella (once, if born after 1956, have never received the vaccine, and are not already immune).

For many people, even if they have one of these conditions, the vaccines may be contraindicated for some reason. This information is not intended as medical advice. Every senior and every person with one of these conditions should consult with their personal healthcare provider about their own situation. And one conversation is not enough: new vaccines are always being developed, and guidelines are always being published.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in the most appropriate and patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

Friday, 27 December 2019 03:31

Shingles: A Serious Risk in the Elderly

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Chickenpox may be a childhood disease, but it can recur in adults —much more virulently — as shingles. Both chickenpox and shingles are caused by the varicella-zoster virus, but the virus has very different effects in each case. While chickenpox results in an itchy, blistering rash, shingles first presents as pain, followed by a red rash after several days.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in three Americans will develop shingles. The risk increases with age: people over age 60 are at greater risk than younger people, and those over 80 have a 50% risk of developing the disease.

A weak immune system increases the risk of shingles. Antirejection medication after an organ transplant or steroid use, or undergoing radiation or chemotherapy increases the risk.

Not only are seniors far more likely to develop shingles, they are also more likely to have serious complications from it. The most common complication is postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), pain that lasts persists even after the rash disappears. PHN can last for years, and is often debilitating. Both the risk and the severity of PHN is greater the older the person is.

Other complications of shingles in seniors include pneumonia, hearing loss, facial paralysis, blindness, toxic shock syndrome, bacterial infection, and encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain.

Shingles is also associated with a significant increase in stroke and heart attack in the week following the occurrence.

Antiviral medications can reduce the severity of an attack of shingles, but prevention is the best medicine. The CDC recommends that healthy adults above the age of 50 get vaccinated against shingles. Most insurance plans, including Medicare Part D, cover at least part of the cost of the shingles vaccine. For those who cannot pay, GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of Shingrix, the preferred shingles vaccine, offers financial assistance.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in the most appropriate and patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

 

Thursday, 12 December 2019 22:56

SeniorSafe Act Protects Seniors from Financial Abuse

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A 2015 report on Elder Financial Abuse estimates that financial abuse costs seniors $36 billion each year. Abuse can take the form of financial exploitation: when misleading language and, often, pressure tactics, are used to obtain a senior’s consent for payment for services or products. Seniors are also vulnerable to deceit or theft perpetrated by a caregiver, and to telephone and internet scams.

Shawna Reeves, Director of Elder Abuse Prevention at the Institute on Aging, states that, “Those of us working in the field have long known that the United States is in the throes of an elder financial abuse epidemic.”

The SeniorSafe Act, written by members of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, and passed last year, empowers financial institutions such as banks, credit unions, insurance companies, and investment houses to report suspicions of financial abuse of seniors to the authorities. Before the SeniorSafe Act, privacy laws constrained financial institutions from reporting suspected abuse. It also adjures these institutions to educate their staff to recognize what financial abuse of seniors looks like.

Employees at financial institutions are often the first to notice such signs of financial fraud as unusual patterns of cash withdrawal and unusual wire transfers, often to foreign countries.

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has also instituted a rule that allows brokerage account holders to list a trusted person who can be contacted when financial abuse is suspected.

Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia already have laws in place requiring suspected abuse to be reported. The SeniorSafe Act does not require reporting, but it adds protections for seniors in states that do not have mandatory financial abuse reporting laws.

The Senate Special Committee on Aging publishes an annual resource book to help seniors protect themselves against fraud, and includes a list of the top ten scams reported to the Committee’s Fraud Hotline. This book should be required reading for seniors and those who love them.

Wednesday, 27 November 2019 01:44

Loneliness is Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease

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As the population ages, more effort is directed into research about one of the most frightening diseases associated with the elder years: Alzheimer’s Disease. A variety of risk factors, including cardiovascular disease, depression, diabetes, and smoking, have already been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer’s. But now a large study has uncovered a new risk factor: loneliness.

The study, published in The Journals of Gerontology, followed over 12,000 people aged 50 and over for ten years. Researchers, controlling for other known risk factors, found that loneliness was associated with an increased Alzheimer’s risk of 40% over the course of the ten-year period. The increased risk was unrelated to gender, race, ethnic city, or education.

Interestingly, the increased risk provided by loneliness was also independent to whether the study participant was socially isolated. “Social isolation” is an objective measure of how many social contacts a person has on a regular basis. “Loneliness,” however, is a purely subjective experience. The study demonstrated that if a person feels lonely, they have an increased risk of Alzheimer’s, regardless of the number of friends they have.

The study reinforces our understanding that risk factors are not simply objective measurements, but also the subjective interpretation a person has of their situation.

The good news, according to Dr. Angelina Sutin, lead author of the study, is that loneliness “is a modifiable risk factor.” How can you modify this risk factor for your loved one? By ensuring that someone is looking out for your loved one, taking note of their emotional state, and taking action to ensure they are healthy, emotionally as well as physically.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in the most appropriate and patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence.

Because an active, involved and rewarding lifestyle is vital to our residents’ total well-being, at Regency, our recreation staff is much larger than a typical facility of similar size.

A comprehensive and stimulating array of programs is designed to appeal to a variety of tastes, interests and levels of ability, and is offered seven days a week. With an emphasis on empowering the residents, our recreational programs encourage patients and residents to fulfill their potential and remain engaged and involved. Individually tailored activities and programs include live entertainment, lectures, trips and events that encourage socialization and participation.

Regency offers a full continuum of care, including exceptional short-term rehabilitation, sub-acute care, long-term nursing, a range of specialty programs and complex clinical services, hospice care and temporary respite care. Our compassionate, personalized approach, has established our long-standing and unparalleled reputation for excellence.

We always maintain the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

 

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

Loneliness is Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease

As the population ages, more effort is directed into research about one of the most frightening diseases associated with the elder years: Alzheimer’s Disease. A variety of risk factors, including cardiovascular disease, depression, diabetes, and smoking, have already been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer’s. But now a large study has uncovered a new risk factor: loneliness.

The study, published in The Journals of Gerontology, followed over 12,000 people aged 50 and over for ten years. Researchers, controlling for other known risk factors, found that loneliness was associated with an increased Alzheimer’s risk of 40% over the course of the ten-year period. The increased risk was unrelated to gender, race, ethnic city, or education.

Interestingly, the increased risk provided by loneliness was also independent to whether the study participant was socially isolated. “Social isolation” is an objective measure of how many social contacts a person has on a regular basis. “Loneliness,” however, is a purely subjective experience. The study demonstrated that if a person feels lonely, they have an increased risk of Alzheimer’s, regardless of the number of friends they have.

The study reinforces our understanding that risk factors are not simply objective measurements, but also the subjective interpretation a person has of their situation.

The good news, according to Dr. Angelina Sutin, lead author of the study, is that loneliness “is a modifiable risk factor.” How can you modify this risk factor for your loved one? By ensuring that someone is looking out for your loved one, taking note of their emotional state, and taking action to ensure they are healthy, emotionally as well as physically.

At the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers, we offer the very best of care in the most appropriate and patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence.

Because an active, involved and rewarding lifestyle is vital to our residents’ total well-being, at Regency, our recreation staff is much larger than a typical facility of similar size.

A comprehensive and stimulating array of programs is designed to appeal to a variety of tastes, interests and levels of ability, and is offered seven days a week. With an emphasis on empowering the residents, our recreational programs encourage patients and residents to fulfill their potential and remain engaged and involved. Individually tailored activities and programs include live entertainment, lectures, trips and events that encourage socialization and participation.

Regency offers a full continuum of care, including exceptional short-term rehabilitation, sub-acute care, long-term nursing, a range of specialty programs and complex clinical services, hospice care and temporary respite care. Our compassionate, personalized approach, has established our long-standing and unparalleled reputation for excellence.

We always maintain the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here to see which of our three facilities will best meet your needs or the needs of your loved one.

 

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